At a standstill (Whimsical Weekend #12)

Yeah…I’m not even ashamed to be posting this on Monday midnight. The truth is, I haven’t been motivated at all to come up with a proper post over the course of these two weeks. I’ve just been going through the standard routine of going to work every weekday and using my leisure time to indulge in whatever forms of entertainment may tickle my fancy. In particular, watching Twitch streams while doing some freelance coding is what I’ve been into lately. (Whom I watch depends mostly on the time of day, but twitch.tv/360chrism is definitely the stream where I hang out most.)

I suppose, if there’s anything I would have felt like writing about if I had taken more time to think, it’s Hyperdimension Neptunia Re;Birth 1. Part of me wanted to save such talk until after completing the entire Re;Birth series, but later on I thought, “Well, it was recently that I decided that I had played the first installment to my heart’s content, so…” Wait, actually, I was considering optimizing the equipment of at least my main party members (Blanc, Noire, Vert, Ram, Neptune, and Nepgear), and I never really got around to that, so perhaps delaying that sort of talk is for the best.

I was also considering talking about the Conceptis Block-a-Pix app now that it’s recently come out on Android (I don’t have an iOS device), but there’s not much to talk about, considering I’ve done an entire analysis on the form of puzzle in question, so I’ll just say here what little I have to about the app. My main beef with it is: If you create a box around a number, the area of that box can exceed the number of tiles required by that number, whereas the site applet has a constraint for that. Second, in greater puzzle sizes on smaller screens (e.g., 30*45 on an 854*480 screen), it’s hard to tell ‘6’s from ‘8’s. The second one is not of dire importance and definitely not an easy fix (considering it’s the standard Conceptis font), but I’m hoping the first one gets fixed in a future update.

I guess that’s all for now.

 À la prochaine! (Until next time!)

…Hopefully I’ll actually have a substantial post by then…

Mudsdale (Poké Monday 5/8/17)

Type: Ground

Base Stats:

  • 100 HP
  • 125 Attack
  • 100 Defense
  • 55 Special Attack
  • 85 Special Defense
  • 35 Speed

Ability choices:

  • Own Tempo Mudsdale cannot be confused.
  • Stamina Mudsdale have their Defense boosted upon taking direct damage.
  • Inner Focus Mudsdale are impervious to flinching. (Hidden Ability)

Notable physical attacks: Close Combat, Earthquake, Heavy Slam, Payback, Rock Slide, Rock Tomb

Mudsdale has no notable status moves.

Notable Z-moves:

  • Tectonic Rage (Ground) – Converts one use of Earthquake into a base 180 physical Ground-type attack.
  • Continental Crush (Rock) – Converts one use of Rock Slide into a base 140 physical Rock-type attack.
  • All-Out Pummeling (Fighting) – Converts one use of Close Combat into a base 190 physical Fighting-type attack.

Overview

As a Poké Ride, Mudsdale’s purpose is to walk on rocky surfaces. Competitively, its most distinguishable role is as a tank. That is to say, its offensive prowess is hindered by its low Speed, and it lacks utility options for making use of its 100/100/85 bulk, but base 125 Attack allows it to hit hard with Ground STAB and such. As another plus, Mudsdale’s unique Ability in Stamina is helpful for allowing it to take physical attacks as long as it remains in play.

However, Mudsdale’s typing, while hitting five types super-effectively on the offensive side and only being weak to three types on the defensive side, has some noticeable cons to it. First, on the defensive side, its three weaknesses are rather common, especially among special attackers. Second, on the offensive side, its STAB can easily be avoided by Flying-types and users of Levitate, while Mudsdale doesn’t quite have the coverage to supplement its STAB. Lack of Stone Edge makes its Rock STAB weak; Close Combat is rather redundant coverage with Earthquake (especially since both have two resistant types in common: Bug and Flying); Heavy Slam, while mostly strong, isn’t quite up to snuff coverage-wise; and Payback, arguably its best bet coverage-wise, is situational (notably, Bronzong, the main Pokémon it hits super-effectively, is naturally slower, meaning the attack is normally only 50 base power against it).

To summarize, Mudsdale is a physical tank with a unique Ability but relatively poor coverage.

Sets

1: Choice Band

Mudsdale @ Choice Band
Ability: Stamina
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 4 SpD
Adamant Nature
– Earthquake
– Close Combat
– Heavy Slam
– Rock Slide

This set lumps all of Mudsdale’s best attacking options into one set. Earthquake is its best STAB, Close Combat notably deals extra damage to Ice- and Normal-types, Heavy Slam hits for maximum base power against most things that resist Earthquake, and Rock Slide deals the highest possible damage to Mantine.

EVs and Nature are centered around Attack and bulk, particularly the former. Stamina is the Ability of choice because its other options are more situational.

2: Rest + Sleep Talk

Mudsdale @ Leftovers
Ability: Stamina
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 4 SpD
Impish Nature
– Earthquake
– Rock Tomb
– Rest
– Sleep Talk

The combination of Rest and Sleep Talk is, sadly, Mudsdale’s most reliable means of regaining HP. Moreover, all it can really do with its bulk is whittle down the opposition with Earthquake (which still does decent damage even off uninvested Attack) and use Rock Tomb for Speed control. At any rate, the set and physically defensive investment thereof serve to take better advantage of its exclusive Ability.

Other Options

On the Choice Band set, Sleep Talk can prevent sleep move abusers, particularly Gallade with Z-Hypnosis, from completely shutting it down. On the defensive set, Toxic can be used over Rock Tomb in case Speed control is not particularly helpful. Everything else (basically only Payback) has pretty much already been mentioned.

Problems and Partners

Problems

Special attackers, particularly those with super-effective STAB, can pose a problem to Mudsdale. In fact, Mudsdale has no super-effective coverage against any of the three above, and all three (yes, even Alolan Exeggutor) outspeed.

Burn abusers can also be problematic if Mudsdale lacks Rest. Mantine is immune to Earthquake and has super-effective STAB, while Cofagrigus has great physical bulk and means to attack Mudsdale’s weaker defense.

In general, Mudsdale is not invincible. For this reason, even physical attackers, if they have the means to set up and/or deal heavy damage with their raw power, can wear it down if given the opportunity.

Partners

 

While a problem, Mantine can also serve as a partner. The two complement each other well typing-wise—Mudsdale resisting all of Mantine’s weaknesses while Mantine resists one of Mudsdale’s weaknesses and is neutral to the other two—and stat-wise (as in, Mantine’s special tankiness complements Mudsdale’s physical tankiness). Mantine can also Defog away Toxic Spikes if needed.

Rotom is the only thing currently legal in Mudsdale’s tier that can single-handedly deal with the Water-types and Ghost-types that are problematic from a defensive standpoint. Its access to Volt Switch has potential to provide a free switch opportunity, although only in particular situations.

Other than that, anything that can keep special and/or super-effective attackers at bay, or anything that promotes longevity of a tank by some other means, is a good partner for Mudsdale.